Living Wood: Tracings

The work in this exhibition explores wood’s material history by extracting artifacts from a digital exploration of the effect of mass movements in the landscape on the growth and form of trees.

Trees affected by mass movements record the evidence of geomorphic disturbance in the growth-ring series. The simulation of this mass movement, in the form of a distorted digital surface, is shown as both a projection and a registration.

Tracings is a 200 square-foot grid made up of 288 individual squares of Ontario White Maple. Using the modern tools of digital fabrication, each piece is carved to a depth that registers the angle of a curved surface projected onto its face. From a distance, one reads the undulating plane registered on the wood’s surface. Up close, the subtle differences between each piece become apparent. The result mimics the forest in that each piece of wood is unique, and builds to a whole greater than the sum of its parts.

The Tracings series (in smaller sections from 4 to 16 blocks each) is available at the Corkin Gallery. Please call Jane Corkin for more information.

Tracings, Serere 1-41, 2014
Ontario White Maple
288 10″x10″x2 1/4″ blocks composed into 41 plots
30’-8-3/4”x 6’-9-3/4”

The work in this exhibition explores wood’s material history by extracting artifacts from a digital exploration of the effect of mass movements in the landscape on the growth and form of trees. Trees affected by mass movements record the evidence of geomorphic disturbance in the growth-ring series. The simulation of this mass movement, in the form of a distorted digital surface, is shown as  a registration.

A project completed by Williamson Chong

Project News

Living Wood published on urbanNext

Thank you to urbanNext for picking up our Living Wood Exhibition from last year and sharing Bob Gundu‘s beautiful images. You can find the article here.

RAIC Festival of Architecture

Between June 3rd and 6th, 2015, architects, interns, students and associates as well as the general public will gather in Calgary, Alberta to network, discuss issues related to the practice of architecture and design, celebrate achievements and socialize. Williamson Chong will be presenting their research at a session on Friday morning. It will be informative, fun, and get you three whole con ed points!

As recipients of the 2012 Professional Prix de Rome from the Canada Council of the Arts, the 2014 Emerging Voices Award from the Architecture League of New York, and the 2014 Emerging Architectural Practice from the RAIC, the principals of Williamson Chong will present the findings of their recent travels and research that focused upon advanced wood technologies, emerging fabrication platforms, and exemplary wood buildings. Amongst other topics, new growth timber will be discussed relative to its predominant position in the discourse of sustainability, and its role within the distinct and varied building industries of North America and Europe.

Architects’ Passion for Wood Makes Gallery Debut

John Bentley Mays, "Architects’ Passion for Wood Makes Gallery Debut", The Globe and Mail, November 27, 2014.

“Williamson Chong’s installation of sculpted forms and prints is a tribute to wood’s beauty and malleability, and to the expressive lyricism that wood, trees and forests have inspired in poetry, art and architecture since antiquity,” John Bentley Mays eloquently writes on the Living Wood exhibition now installed at the Corkin Gallery in the Distillery District. The article can be found on the Globe and Mail’s website or in the November 27th print edition of the paper.

The Exhibition will be up through the holidays.

The Globe and Mail’s ‘The New Radicals’ on innovators in arts and culture

Ellen Himelfarb, "The New Radicals: How these Toronto architects are advancing the artistic application of wood", The Globe and Mail, November 20, 2014

Ellen Himelfarb profiles Williamson Chong as part of  The New Radicals series in the Globe and Mail. The article speaks to our research travel in the last two years as well as the exhibition that opens on November 20, at the Corkin Gallery.

“They’re at the forefront where theories of design and technological advancement come together,” says gallerist Jane Corkin of the architects, “an intersection representative of the arts in the 21st century.” To support the work of Williamson Chong, Corkin has curated a supporting exhibition called On Architecture and Structure, linking the firm’s theories on design, technology and ecology to painters, photographers and digital artists.

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